Website Design Archives | Fetchprofits
16 Front Page Designs Built For High Conversions

16 Front Page Designs Built For High Conversions

Front page designs for websites or hero sections of your home page is prime real estate, but most website owners and marketers treat it like garbage.

Ideally, for maximum conversions, home pages should be built like landing pages.

Landing pages are designed with a singular goal in mind: what do you want your visitors to do?

The most important thing they should do is to signup and get on your list.

Why?

  • Nobody is going to buy from you right away (if it happens, you are lucky)
  • Visitors won’t even signup for your free offers right away (Industry benchmark for conversions is a mere 1.56%
  • Read everything you wrote at one go and then go to your checkout page.
  • Arrive at your website and bookmark your page as if you were the only one out there doing what you do.
  • People have choices
  • On the Internet, everyone has low attention spans.

But then, those are landing pages and that’s why they are an important part of a marketing funnel.

Home pages, however, don’t get the respect they deserve. You call it home, and then do what?

  • Have a single image that never loads
  • Fill it up with garbage like sliders
  • Showcase your latest blogs
  • Tell the world what a huge company you are

When you build a home page like a landing page, your home page also starts working to ramp up your conversions.

Bryan Harris of VideoFruit calls a home page built like a landing page as an “Inverted Pyramid page” or as an “Upside down” page.

Call it whatever, but you should turn your home page into a landing page.

Here are 16 examples of individuals, bloggers, and companies that did just that.

Evernote

Evernote, much like DropBox and Google, was always built home page designs with the sole intent of converting visitors into users. While Evernote still has a “freemium” way of doing business, the sheer elegance and the effectiveness with which it accomplishes what it does should be an inspiration for every business.

Period.

Coach

 

 

Coach might be relatively new to the “teach your online courses” platforms, but the home page just works. The white and blue combination brings elegance, sophistication, and charm to the page.

I also recently explained why I use Coach.

But that’s not why it’s listed here.

It’s here because that home page is converting for Coach, and it’s kicking everyone else’s ass as you read this.

Webflow

 

Notice how webflow makes you take action, right at the top? Name, email, password, and signup.

That’s it.

Webflow makes everyone a designer cum developer. It’s not entirely a drag-and-drop website builder. But nor is it something for hobbyists to hack and stitch some random-looking website. Webflow brings chutzpah to HTML designs.

It boasts of fast hosting and beautiful website designs along with animations and many unique layout possibilities.

Noah kagan (OkDork)

 

The marketing champ, the Noah, the Kagan. The man who built AppSumo and SumoMe. Who else can teach us how to design a home page that just has to convert the way it does?

Noah has been one of those other influencers who insists on a gated home page that functions like a landing page. He probably started it all and others followed.

Robbie Richards

 

Robbie Richards is the go to guy when it comes to SEO. His painstakingly written, extra long blog posts apart, he is also a great case study for “content upgrades”, going deep into SEO, and while we are at it, he is also the man who seems to have ripped SEMRush apart and put it back together.

Ramit Sethi (I will Teach You To Be Rich)

 

Ramit is a master at marketing. An author, a celebrity, and the guy who can’t bear the thought of you sacrificing your latte. His incredibly awesome content at Iwillteachyoutoberich.com he uses several design best practices to bring him what he wants: subscribers.

You just have to love his home page design for IWillTeachYouToBeRich: He puts his face up there (I wish I had a photo like that) and starts you off playfully with a quiz. I have a feeling that the quiz results are only accessible if you provide an email address.

Genius.

He also started GrowthLab – which is more like a magazine – and is an awesome read by itself.

Bench

 

What do accountants, book keeping guys, and fancy financial heads know a thing about marketing?

Oh, they do. Just look at Bench

See the pretty girl talking to you over coffee? That did it for me (except that I am in India and I don’t think Bench can serve me here).

The pretty lady aside, there are just two fields and a free trial.

Bench is your personal book-keeping team. Instead of struggling to find some freelancer or an expensive full-time hire, just pick Bench and they’ll take care of book-keeping, auditing, accounting, and your other financial needs.

MyClean

 

You’d think that “cleaning” can be a boring business to be in, right? Maybe. But MyClean does remarkable things with its home page.

Notice how you can choose your service, location, and go for a booking right away. My only worry for this home page is that MyClean might just miss out on future bookings (by using marketing automation and email nurturing) by focusing on the “now”.

A great looking page, especially for an industry that at least is not as hot as SaaS tools.

Intercom

Intercom brings it all together: customer support, livechat, and the fact that you are a lovely human being who happens to run a business and also care for your customers.

It’s very popular already but take a look at their home page and you’ll love it – and not because it’s just so adorable to look at.

It’s also because Intercom makes it so damned easy to “get started”. If you are a nosy guy like me though, you’ll probably watch the video first.

The page packs a punch. Aren’t those characters on the page awesome?

Airtable

 

Power of a video, the adorability of a child, and a single-field signup ask. That’s what makes this page such a beautiful and effective home page design for Airtable.

Airtable is an online database service. As a product, is something like a Swiss army knife. Dylan Tweney of VentureBeat writes, Airtable aims to target people who want to organize information with much greater flexibility than Excel, for instance.

Don’t let Airtable’s simplistic explanation of what it does fool you, since there’s more under the hood. The dra-and-drop interface allows you to connect millions of specialized apps, each serving a unique purpose for users.

Using Airtable’s Integrations, you can also connect other apps with Zapier and make your data come to life.

Marvel App

 

The simplistic design, a demonstration of what’s possible with an image along the CTA, and the CTA itself is a winner for Marvel App.

The Marvel App was built was developers and designers to help them design, prototype, and collaborate with teams and/or clients.

Designers and developers can create app screens directly in Marvel or add assets from Sketch or Photoshop or sync with cloud storage. Marvel’s editor allows you view, edit, and share designs right from your iphone or tablet (apart from the web).

 

Mixpanel

 

A single call to action that fires off with users just submitting an email address to get started is something that’s apparently worked for MixPanel.

MixPanel is that little startup with an Analytics tool that beats Neil patel’s KissMetrics today. MixPanel allows you to get analytics for you to understand a users’ journey with instant insights. It also has built AB testing, funnels, engagement, and more.

Is their home page working?

The company just raised $65 million from Andreessen Horowitz which now values the company at $865 million – a firm step towards a world of data analytics.

That tells us something, eh?

Asana

 

Asana has color, charm, and simplicity built into its home page design. On top of that, it’s easier than ever to create an account. Signup or just login using Google.

How easy is that?

Now, a lot of people know Asana. It’s a fantastic project management tool and this is the one I use to manage all my projects, along with those of clients. Asana makes it really easy to setup projects, tasks.

If you are smart, you can also use Asana for a lot of other purposes such as a CRM, a bug tracking tool, a support desk, or whatever.

It plays well.

Front

 

Imagine yourself, in the normal course of a day: blog posts, twitter feeds, Whatsapp messages, phone calls, messages, and Facebook.

Doesn’t your life look cluttered already?

Now, multiply this clutter by 10 times or 150 times. Can you imagine the chaos?

That’s what Front hopes to clear, and is a dream come true for teams. Front brings all yur external messages, emails, support tickets, Twitter updates, Facebook Messenger messages, chat, and SMS into one, unified Inbox.

The home is as simple as the app proclaims itself to be. Simple headline, a description that aids the headline, and a tempting 14 day free trial is all that there is between their users and themselves.

Gusto

 

We are selling to people. Humans read your blog posts. Jon doe finally buys from you or becomes a user.

Gusto knows that.

Take a look at their home page (and I happened to know their previous home page variant too) and they’ll usually feature a real human being (happy, of course) working away. Because everyone starts from the left of the page, the minimalistic signup form also sits on the top left.

Plus, they have a one-month free trial. Gusto’s home page ticks off everything on a typical landing page best practice guide. Minimum possible fields on form, a great background image, and testimonials (for social proof).

Sumo

 

What does a $7-million-dollar company know about landing pages, funnels, and the art of signups?

They do know a lot, when they seem like they practically invented it.

SumoMe is a power Suite of tools built to do just one thing for you: build your subscribers. It also helps you get traffic and boost your social presence (but those are secondary).

For yeas now, their home page has been a terrific marketing case study: a strong offer (try free) and a simple way for people to signup.

You know about Sumo. I don’t have to say much.

What do you think of about these designs? Are you trying to work and get your own home page turned into landing page? Tell me what you think.

How to Trim Website Code Bloat

How to Trim Website Code Bloat

 

Let’s admit it. Most small businesses have websites that have grown slow, fat, and with a serious case of code bloat.

You think not?

According to Andy Favell of Clickz, the size of webpages sent to mobile phones quadrupled in the last 5 years. Out of the entire load, images account for 68% of the ridiculous average of 2.2 MB.

We’ve seen enough cases of our clients where they don’t get the results they deserve just because of this bloated fat — and this fat comes in all sorts of things.

It’s not just file sizes and code bloat that’s the issue though. There’s also the question of website speed, security, and how your website is setup to meet goals assigned to each of those website pages.

Start with Managed Hosting

First, start off with the right kind of hosting.

  1. If you are on HTML/CSS, go with an Amazon deployment or Google Cloud.
  2. If you use WordPress, use any of the options below:

Flywheel (Our hosts)
Studiopress sites (Used for clients)
WPEngine (Used for clients)
Page.ly (Out of our budget for the moment)
Kinsta (Out of our budget for the moment)

WordPress Managed hosting or at least using a VPS optimised for WordPress helps speed up your site and also adds various levels of security to your website. Most managed hosts have optimised infrastructure in place specific to WordPress. These hosts work around the clock to ensure clean, malware free environment.

In most cases, there’s also scalability built in to ensure that your website is not shut off when your have traffic spikes or you suddenly get famous.

Speed Up Your Slow Boat

Ask yourself this: What happens if my website is slow?

The folks at Skilled.co have an answer:

79% of customers who run into any kind of performance issues on your website are less likely to buy from you again. This covers more than just the time load time of your website, but the speed of your website is one of the easiest things to fix on order to prevent hesitation among repeat buyers.

A delay in load time of just one second can leave you with a 7% reduction in conversions. For example, if your website is bringing in $100,000 per day in sales that one second delay could be costing you $7,000 per day or more.

They also have an infographic to show how important website speed is:


Presented by Skilled.co

Smriti Chawla of SixRevisions collected a few actual experiments that explain the impact of slower website page load times.

How fast is your website? Go take a look at your website performance using Google PageSpeed Insights or PingDom.

Worry about the Home Page Factor

 

Your website could suffer from any of those points, or maybe it just lacks focus. Gina Greco of Marketing Sherpa writes about a few tell tale signs that you can use to identify if your website lacks focus:

1. What does your home page have? One focus? Or many? Gina points at whether or not your home page has “all” the products or just the popular products?
2. Does your copy talk “at” your customers or talk “to” your customers?
3. She points to an important series of questions by Flint McGlaughlin, Managing Director, MECLABS: the homepage should answer three main questions for customers almost instantly:

  • Where am I?
  • What can I do here?
  • Why should I do it with you?

Your website home page is too important for you to screw up with meaningless sliders, crappy graphics, and good for nothing fancy design that serves no purpose (except to massage your ego).

Your home page should focus on exactly what you need from your visitors – What’s the easiest, low-commitment task that you’d want your visitors to take? What do you want them to do? Is the home page built to work like a machine to get you the results you need?
Tim Ash, the leading landing page expert, pointed out two distinct steps to build trust with your home page. Here’s what he has to write on importance of home page design:

“A website home page is a map of the world for that site – or at least it should be. Its purpose is to let site visitors know the range of things that can be done within the site or the scope of products, services or information that can be found.

To accomplish this, visitors first need to think that your company or organization is worthy of their business and they need to trust that you can give them what they need.”

Tim recommends using social proof, endorsements, transactional assurances (by addressing visitors’ concerns at every touch point).

Personalise those Visits

 

Websites are lonely places and most of the browsing that happens are private instances. As such, you’ll do great if you bring in certain ways to personalise the browsing experience.

Adobe’s June briefing reports that about 37% of companies are able to target personalised web content in the right context, in real-time. These companies surveyed use personal data, purchase history, browser history, user preferences, and on-site behaviour to personalise the experience.

Ott Niggulis of ConversionXL helpfully pointed at a few case studies that just prove how effective personalisation can be:
* Visual Website Optimizer saw a 149% increase in clickthrough rates to their “careers” page.
* Bedbathstore.com improved conversion rates by by 10% throughout the site.

Judge Graham of SearchEngineWatch proves that personalisation has benefits. He writes:

“You can cut through the clutter and filter out the noise by making the web experience more relevant to the individual. It’s a more targeted approach that’s been proven to be much more effective.

When you provide a personalized experience, visitors remain on your website longer, download more offers, and ultimately purchase more products.”.

If you started off with some kind of a membership site or if you happen to know when your users are logged in, you have a head start here. For bloggers, small business websites, and many other regular websites, full-fledged personalizing is harder to achieve.

There are tools like GoSquared (People feature and Smart Lists), WebEngage, and other tools such as LiveChat that you can use to make sure you are there when those visits happen.

 

Follow One CTA Per Page Rule

 

Small business websites are the most guilty when it comes to not following what I call the “One Page per CTA” rule. This simply means that every page on your website should have a singular Call to Action.

This is only possible if you think ahead and decide what your goals for each page are.

For instance:

* Home Page — The most important CTA ( fix an appointment? Download an eBook? Read blog? Contact? Buy something? Signup for a free trial?
* About Page — Learn more? Read your blog posts? Join your personal network?
* Product pages — Buy products
* Contact page — Contact now.
* Services — subscribe, buy, or learn more?

If you leave your website pages without a CTA, your visitors will exit just as happily as they came in. Period.

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6 Reasons Why Website DIY Builders Save You Cash

6 Reasons Why Website DIY Builders Save You Cash

You might not think of it much but with a single act or a choice of going for DIY Website Builders can save you at least about $7000, more or less when you are looking to design or redesign your website.

How, you ask?

We could just write a one-liner such as this: direct savings, indirect savings, and opportunity cost.

We could then throw in wasted time learning, practicing, and doing your due diligence counting to “10,000 hours” as Malcolm Gladwell writes in his popular book, The Outliers.

Website DIY builders only average around $10 per month (including hosting, which you’d need anyway). While we are at it, here are some of the best website DIY builders you get for your money:

Weebly
Mozello
Strikingly
Wix
Duda
SquareSpace

Website DIY Builder Options for Ecommerce

Shopify
BigCommerce

Wondering how a website builder saves you money? Here’s how:

Study. Do. Study. Do

Education is expensive. If you were an individual or a small business owner itching to create websites for yourself, you’d have to learn a bunch of technologies such as HTML5, CSS3, My SQL, Javascript, J Queries, or even server side programming – depending on what kind of website you are looking to build.

Offline education can easily cost you “an arm and a leg” and doesn’t make any sense to invest in that. Online education also sets you back by anywhere from $15 to $120 per month (books and other reference material not included).

Hint: Learning coding alone can set you back by $400 per year on study material alone.

Time

Choosing to “learn and do” website design is a choice that’ll cost you the time you’d use to run your business, build your team, and do things you are better off with. Assuming it takes you a year to learn HTML and CSS basics along with another year to get anywhere near average skill level with coding, you’d have lost a couple of years.

Sometimes, 2-3 years is all it takes for a startup to gain the tipping point (AirBnB and Evernote, each worth millions of dollars, case in point).

Software

Building websites – with the exception of DIY website builders – cost you professional software such as Adobe’s Suite of products. Adobe’s Suite of products can cost you around $50 per month (depending on where you live).

This is a recurring subscription that adds up to $600 per year. You’d then spend another $360 on a premium hosting account, along with all kinds of tools you’d need to build that website. Give this setup about 7 years and you’d have paid more than $7000 for one-time work or just for a few websites.

Subscriptions

If you choose not to use a DIY website builder, you’d need a couple of other subscriptions to keep your website up. Security software, a Content Delivery Network (to make your website load fast), the cost for using stand-alone software for emails, and more.

Add each of these up and you’ll easily rack up more than a few thousand dollars in the average it takes a webmaster to realize that you are overspending for things you’d find a usual DIY website builder package.

Ongoing costs for conversion optimization

In digital marketing, conversion optimization is big for the simple reason that it’s the one, single, ongoing activity that turns your website from a digital brochure to a humongous money-maker. If you had to depend on yourself (or others) for website design, you’d never get this as a part of the website development package (yet, this is exactly what you need).

Your website is never a done thing. But the only way you can save thousands of dollars on ongoing conversion optimization spend is when you cut down the time it takes to make a website go live and spend time and resources on CRO.

Opportunity Cost

Every choice we make is set off against a choice we didn’t make. Instead of spending your precious time building a website (which you could easily outsource or build one using a web builder), you could be hustling, networking, doing a few things that can change the way you do business, hire more people, and more.

You might not realize it but a few decisions we make can prove to be expensive. Are you making these expensive mistakes when it comes to website design or using DIY website builders?

Need a Website? You Are Getting It All Wrong

Need a Website? You Are Getting It All Wrong

 

Do you need a website for your business (or are you are looking for a redesign)?

Stop pretending like you are constructing a bridge across continents.

You might not think of it much, but using a DIY Website Builder like Weebly or Mozello can save you tons of money that you would be better off spending elsewhere.

Use Webflow, Wix, Duda, and many others available today. If nothing, just pick up hosting and get a WordPress website.

Why you ask? I can write it in a single line: you won’t get it right, you’ll lose money, and you can spend money elsewhere.

You will accrue indirect savings, and avoid the opportunity cost.

We could then throw in wasted time learning, practicing, and doing your due diligence of giving those precious “10,000 hours” as Malcom Gladwell writes in his popular book, The Outliers.

If you need a website, you could put it up in a day. A website builder averages $10 per month (including hosting, which you’d need anyway).

Wondering how a website builder saves you money? Here’s how:

The wrong website, sorry

Getting things right for your website (assuming you’d like to tick off all the points needed to get your strategy together, to maximize profits) is complicated.

Everyone seems to have an “idea” about how they want their websites to be.

I need pink color on the header.
Upload this image here and not there.
My product is unique. My website should be unique.
This is how I want my website to be.

What “you” think or feel about your website is immaterial. What matters is how many leads your website generates. Or how much of a branding pack does your website make?

If your website never got you business yet, it’s pointless.

The “Looks good” fallacy

Too many businesses decide if a website is good or bad by the way it looks.

Looks are deceiving. Good looking sites don’t mean a thing for you while a few ugly looking sites are laughing all the way to the bank.

Show me an ugly profitable site and I’ll show you at least 10 websites in return that look good but didn’t make a single dollar yet.

You are not in competition for looks; you are competing for profits (or at least for survival)

Study. Do. Study. Do

Education is expensive. If you were an individual or a small business owner itching to create websites for yourself, you’d have to learn a bunch of technologies such as HTML5, CSS3, My SQL, Javascript, J Queries, or even server side programming – depending on what kind of website you are looking to build.

Offline education can easily cost you an arm and a leg, and doesn’t make any sense to invest in that. Online education also sets you back by anywhere from $15 to $120 per month (books and other reference material not included).

Hint: Learning coding alone can set you back by $400 per year on study material alone.

Note: I am not suggesting that education is bad. Please do pick up courses over the weekend or whenever. I am just stating this: don’t reinvent the wheel; not for website design.

The Time You’d Never Get Back

Choosing to “learn and do” website design is a choice that’ll cost you the time you’d use to run your business, build your team, and do things you should really be doing.

Assuming it takes you a year to learn HTML and CSS basics along with another year to get anywhere near average skill level with coding, you’d have lost a couple of years.

Sometimes, 2-3 years is all it takes for a startup to gain the tipping point (AirBnB and Evernote, each worth millions of dollars, case in point).

Thirty Party Software

Building websites – with the exception of DIY website builders – can cost you professional software such as Adobe’s Suite of products. Adobe’s Suite of products can cost you around $50 per month (depending on where you live).

This is a recurring subscription that adds up to $600 per year. You’d then spend another $360 on a premium hosting account, along with all kinds of tools you’d need to build that website.

Give this setup about 7 years and you’d have paid more than $7000 for one-time work or just for a few websites.

Subscriptions To Pillars of Support

If you choose not to use a DIY website builder, you’d need a couple of other subscriptions to keep your website up. Premium hosting (because shared hosting sucks) Security software, a Content Delivery Network (to make your website load fast), cost for using stand alone software for emails, and more.

Add each of these up and you’ll easily rack up more than a few thousand dollars in the average it takes a webmaster to realize that you are overspending for things you’d find a usual DIY website builder package.

Ongoing costs for conversion optimisation

In digital marketing, conversion optimization is big. It’s a single, ongoing activity that turns your website from a digital brochure to a humongous money-maker.

If you had to depend on yourself (or others) for website design, you’d never get this as a part of the website development package (yet, this is exactly what you need).

As Peep Laja of ConversionXL writes,

If you’re currently converting at 1% (1% of your visitors buy your stuff), but can increase that to a mere 2%, you’ve doubled your sales.

Your website is never a done thing. The only way you can save thousands of dollars on ongoing conversion optimisation is when you cut down the time it takes to make a website go live and spend time and resources on CRO.

Conversion optimizations lowers the costs of customer acquisition, helps maximize profits, frees up cash (otherwise spent on useless SEO gimmicks and pointless ad spending), and makes you a winner.

Winners take everything.

The Big Fat Opportunity Cost

Every choice we make is setoff against a choice we didn’t make.

Instead of spending your precious time building a website (which you could easily outsource or build one using a web builder), you could be hustling, networking, doing a few things that can change the way you do business, hire more people, and more.

You might not realize it but a few decisions we make can prove to be expensive. Are you making these expensive mistakes?